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Master Degree Essays

As any graduate school admission officer will tell you, numbers don’t always tell the complete story. If that was the case, students would be admitted or denied solely on their numerical grades and test scores. Instead, graduate school applications usually require an essay component so that school officials can get a sense of a student’s personality, ideals, and commitment to their studies.

Depending on the type of program you wish to enter and the essay question itself, the writing portion of your application could be a chance to tout your achievements, offer a lighthearted glimpse into your personality and writing style, and/or explain what contributions you’d make as a student.

Don’t fret: you don’t have to write the great American novel to get into grad school. On the contrary, you probably have to share your thoughts in 500 words or less. Here are six ways to make those words count.

1. Don’t become a graduate school essay cliché

Grad school essays may require you to answer a specific question (i.e., Discuss a piece of literature that changed your life.); ask you for a general statement (Tell us about yourself.); or about your goals (What do you hope your graduate studies will help you achieve?). No matter the question, you don’t want to end up boring the admission committee with a clichéd response. They have already read thousands of submissions detailing how a traumatic childhood experience influenced your career goals or how a volunteer endeavor changed the way you see the world. Don’t write about lofty ideals or brag about academic triumphs either, just because you assume it’s what admission officers want to hear. Instead, write about something that’s honest, reveals your personality in some way, and makes you a standout applicant.

2. Follow the directions

Forget about the content of your essay for a second. The quickest way to blow it is to ignore the directions. If there is a suggested word count, aim to come as close to it as possible. If there is a direct question, answer it without veering off on a tangent. If you are asked to submit the essay as a single-spaced document in Comic Sans font (okay, probably not, but you never know), then so be it.

3. Keep it clean

You should have impeccable spelling, grammar, and punctuation throughout your essay, and avoid texting slang or vulgar language unless there is an absolutely compelling reason why it needs to be in your story. (Hint: there’s probably not.) If you’re sending in a hard copy, it should be on also be on crisp, white paper without fold marks, crumples, or pizza stains. If you’re e-mailing or attaching a file, be sure it’s named appropriately, and keep the formatting simple (or as directed).

4. Tell your story, in your words

Ditch the thesaurus. Admission folks will not be impressed by a litany of 14-syllable words or Shakespearean quotes, unless there is a reason why they tie into your story. Use conversational language and a consistent, friendly tone. Try reading your essay out loud to make sure it sounds natural. And this probably goes without saying, but it’s a good reminder anyway—never, ever plagiarize or lift words from another source in your personal essay. With the exception of a quote, which you’ll attribute appropriately, the words in your essay must come from your brain. Better yet, they should come from your heart. Try these brainstorming techniques to help get past writer’s block.

5. Take the Instagram approach

No, we’re not saying to use photos and hashtags in your essay. It’s just a modern way of telling you to “show, don’t tell” (remember that from creative writing 101?). In other words, be descriptive and detailed, use colorful metaphors, and avoid superlative terms. You want to try to take your reader to a place or time, and help him or her understand who you are and what makes you tick. Generalized statements like “attending BLANK University will help me achieve my dreams” or “BLANK made me the person I am today” are throwaway sentences.

6. Know your audience

You should never write a one-size-fits-all essay if you’re applying to multiple programs and schools.  Even if the topics are similar, you still want to tailor your writing so that each university your applying to feels like you’re writing it for them. For instance, you might take a different approach for a small Christian university like Olivet Nazarene in Illinois as opposed to a large, urban public institution like New York University or a more specialized program like at the Rhode Island School of Design.

Now that you’re armed with these prose pointers, put them into practice and wow some grad school admission officers. Happy writing!

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Sample Graduate School Application Essay #2

Another excellent free grad school application essay designed to help inspire grad school bound students with your master’s program application essays.

My East-Indian parents, who moved to the United States from Myanmar, provided me a colorful cultural experience while growing up. My childhood was filled with a unique blend of visits to Buddhist and Hindu temples, eating pizza and curries, and listening to a mix of South Asian and American music. Those diverse cultural experiences made me the woman I am today and I constantly share my one-of-a-kind background through my professional and social work.

As an undergraduate student I constantly strived to involve myself in organizations that would educate the student body about my culture as well as those that advocated on behalf minorities on campus. After graduating, I still desired to raise others’ awareness about important issues faced by societies across the world, which directly motivated me to enter the world of television.

Through television, I wrote about my cultural experience while producing segments for a TV show called “Charlotte Tonight.” In addition, I often urged other producers to write more segments about the varied communities in the greater Charlotte area. To complement my work in television, I also started writing articles for several national magazines talking about my experiences as a first-generation American.

Beyond my distinctive culture, my experience in media has provided eye-opening opportunities to meet a diverse spectrum of distinguished people, from former presidents to NBA players. These encounters have been truly unique experiences that have made me an even more distinct individual, and writing about them has taught me a great deal about myself while simultaneously helping me grow as a writer.

These varied experiences have combined to make me the tolerant, worldly person I am today; I value the opportunity to meet people from all walks of life and never hesitate to share my experiences and knowledge with others to help broaden their own personalities.

For access to 100 free sample successful admissions essays, visit EssayEdge.com, the company The New York Times calls “the world’s premier application essay editing service.” You’ll also find other great essay and editing resources (some free and some fee-based) at EssayEdge.

Go back to Writing the Graduate School Application Essay.

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