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December 2014 Sat Essay

The SAT score release dates are always tense for students. Did you get the score you were aiming for? Do you have to take the SAT again? Checking scores immediately when they come out gives you the most time to plan ahead.

In this article, find out when you'll receive your SAT score report depending on your test date, and learn the fastest way to check your SAT score.

 

How Long Does It Generally Take to Get Your SAT Scores?

SAT scores are typically viewable online starting 13 days after your test date. SATs are taken on Saturdays, and scores generally come out on the second Friday after your test.

According to the College Board, SAT multiple-choice scores can take anywhere from 13 to 19 days to be released. (Note that the summer test dates in June and August typically take longer than this—about three to five and a half weeks.)

If you took the SAT with Essay, your Essay score will generally come out within five days of the release of your multiple-choice scores.

 

When Do SAT Scores Come Out? Full Schedule

The four tables below list every SAT score release date and test date for the 2017-18 and 2018-19 testing years, as confirmed by the College Board.

Note that for most test dates no exact release date is given; instead, there's a span of a week or so during which you could get your multiple-choice scores. In contrast, the date listed for the Essay score is the date by which you'll definitely get your score (though you could also get it earlier).

 

2017-18 SAT Score Release Schedule

SAT Test Date

Multiple-Choice Scores Release Date

Essay Score Release Date

Colleges Receive Scores By

August 26, 2017

September 18, 2017

September 20, 2017

September 30, 2017

October 7, 2017

October 20-26, 2017

October 31, 2017

November 10, 2017

November 4, 2017

November 17-23, 2017

November 28, 2017

December 8, 2017

December 2, 2017

December 15-21, 2017

December 26, 2017

January 5, 2018

March 10, 2018

March 23-29, 2018

April 3, 2018

April 13, 2018

May 5, 2018

May 18-24, 2018

May 29, 2018

June 8, 2018

June 2, 2018

July 11, 2018

July 11, 2018

July 21, 2018

 

2018-19 SAT Score Release Schedule

SAT Test Date

Multiple-Choice Scores Release Date

Essay Score Release Date

Colleges Receive Scores By

August 25, 2018

September 17, 2018

September 19, 2018

September 29, 2018

October 6, 2018

October 19-25, 2018

October 30, 2018

November 9, 2018

November 3, 2018

November 16-22, 2018

November 27, 2018

December 7, 2018

December 1, 2018

December 14-20, 2018

December 25, 2018

January 4, 2019

March 9, 2019

March 22-28, 2019

April 2, 2019

April 12, 2019

May 4, 2019

May 17-23, 2019

May 28, 2019

June 7, 2019

June 1, 2019

July 10, 2019

July 10, 2019

July 20, 2019

*Although the College Board has confirmed SAT test dates for 2018-19, it has yet to confirm score release dates. The score release dates in the chart above are estimates based on our analysis of the patterns of previous testing years.

 

As you can see in these two charts, colleges generally receive your SAT scores within 10 days of online score release. So if you took the SAT with Essay, you can expect colleges to get your scores within 10 days of getting your Essay score. If you took the SAT without Essay, however, colleges will likely receive your scores a couple of days sooner.

What if you take the SAT on a school day, though? Here's an overview of when you can expect to get your scores. Once again, all dates have been confirmed by the College Board.

SAT School Day Test DateMultiple-Choice Scores Release DateEssay Score Release DateColleges Receive Scores By
October 11, 2017November 3, 2017November 3, 2017November 13, 2017
March 7, 2018March 29, 2018March 29, 2018April 8, 2018
March 21, 2018April 13, 2018April 13, 2018April 23, 2018
April 10, 2018May 3, 2018May 3, 2018May 13, 2018
April 24, 2018May 17, 2018May 17, 2018May 27, 2018

 

With school day testing, you'll receive your SAT scores 22-23 days after your test date, and colleges will get your scores within 10 days after that.

 

 

What Time Do SAT Scores Come Out?

Scores are released as early as 5 AM Eastern Time (or 2 AM Pacific Time). However, depending on your account and test date, you might get your scores later in the day. Ultimately, try not to worry too much about exactly when you'll get your score!

 

When Do SAT Scores Get to Schools?

If you put down a college as the recipient of one of your four free score reports, that school will get your scores within 10 days of the online release of your complete score report. Additional score reports (those you order more than nine days after you take the SAT) can take one to two weeks to process before they're sent to schools.

Colleges get score reports from the College Board once a week, usually on Wednesdays. Scores are sent out by the College Board on a rolling basis as you request them.

Some students concerned about their scores getting to schools in time opt for rush reporting, which only take two to four business days to process and are delivered to schools three times a week (usually Monday, Wednesday, and Friday). However, the College Board can't send SAT scores to schools until your test has actually been scored, which will be on the first score release date for your test date at the earliest.

So what's the takeaway here? Unless you can already view your SAT scores online and have a deadline less than three weeks away, it's probably not worth rushing your SAT scores.

 

How to View SAT Scores

The fastest way to get access to your SAT results is online through your College Board account. If you don't have a College Board account, learn how to create one here.

To view your SAT scores, sign into your account on the College Board homepage:

Next, click on "My SAT" to get to your SAT scores:

You'll then be taken to a page with your SAT results for each time you've taken the test:

For a more detailed dive into how to get your SAT scores, take a look at our step-by-step guide.

 

Why Does It Take So Long to Get My SAT Score?

It might feel as though SAT grading shouldn't take as long as a couple of weeks. But because hundreds of thousands of students take the SAT on each test date, there are a lot of steps involved in order for you to finally get your SAT results.

Here's an overview of what happens to your test once you take it:

  • Your test is delivered to the College Board scoring headquarters.
  • Your answer sheet is scanned and your raw score is calculated, based on how many questions you got right or wrong.
  • Your essay (if you took it) is scored by two human graders.
  • Your raw score is then converted to the 1600 scale using that test's scaling rubric.

As you're one of many thousands of students taking the SAT, getting everyone's test scores ready within just a few weeks is obviously a big feat! 

Wouldn't it be great if you could get your score right after the test? This might happen in the future if the test is administered on computers, which is how graduate exams like the GRE work.

 

 

SAT Results: 2 Options for Next Steps

You now know when SAT scores come out, but what should you do once you have your SAT results? Here a couple of options to consider, depending on your score.

 

Low Score? Retake the SAT

If you're unhappy with your SAT results, you might want to consider retaking the test. But whether or not a retake is worth it for you depends on two main factors: your target score and how much you'll be able toimprove your score on a second attempt.

Your SAT goal score is, in short, determined by the average SAT scores of students at the schools you want to apply to. If your SAT results fall short of your target score, then you might want to retake the test to give yourself a better chance of getting into the schools you've chosen.

However, according to data released by the College Board, it's about even odds that if you retake the SAT, your score will either stay the same(10% of students) or drop (35% of students). Therefore, to successfully raise your SAT score on a retake, you'll have to study effectively and for a significant amount of time.

For example, spending 10 hours doing a couple of practice tests in-between SATs likely won't be enough to give you a significant score boost. Instead, you'll need to focus on your weak areas and tailor your prep toward those areas in order to see maximum score gains.

Overall, if you're willing and able to put in the time and effort to improve your SAT score, it's worth it to retake the SAT. If not, then all you'll be doing is wasting money and four hours on a Saturday morning.

 

Solid Score? Send SAT Score Reports to Colleges

If you're satisfied with your SAT results, the next step is to send your scores to the colleges you're applying to. Use our complete list of college codes to make sure your scores get to the right place.

 

 

What's Next?

Ready to retake the SAT but haven't decided on a date yet? Use our continually updated SAT test dates article to see when the next test is being offered. We've also analyzed the best SAT test dates to help you choose the right one for you.

How well do you need to do on the SAT to get into college? Find out with our guides to what the average SAT score for college is and the lowest SAT score possible that'll get you into college.

When's the latest you can take the SAT to have your score get to colleges by their deadlines? Learn what the last SAT test date for early admissions is as well as how late you can take the SAT if you're applying regular decision.

 

Also, click below to get our popular guide to improve 160 points on your next SAT:

 

Essay prompts from the most recent SAT administration

Below are essay prompts from the most recent SAT administration in October 2014.

Prompt 1

Think carefully about the issue presented in the following excerpt and the assignment below.

Some politicians and educators advocate teaching values and character in schools. They claim that children need guidance to develop honesty, kindness, and trustworthiness and that schools should consider it their responsibility to foster these qualities just as they aim to foster academic skills. But good character simply cannot be taught in classrooms and through textbooks. Attempts to make values part of the curriculum will only take time and resources away from important academic subjects.

Assignment: Is it wrong to try to teach values and character in the classroom? Plan and write an essay in which you develop your point of view on this issue. Support your position with reasoning and examples taken from your reading, studies, experience, or observations.

Prompt 2

Think carefully about the issue presented in the following excerpt and the assignment below.

Every country ought to have a program in which all young people are required to commit a year or more of their lives to doing community service at the international, national, or local level. The benefits of this compulsory service - not just for society but for the young people themselves - would far outweigh the personal cost of having to postpone individual goals for a year or more.

Assignment: Should young people be required to commit a year or more of their lives to doing community service? Plan and write an essay in which you develop your point of view on this issue. Support your position with reasoning and examples taken from your reading, studies, experience, or observations.

Prompt 3

Think carefully about the issue presented in the following excerpt and the assignment below.

We tend to think of envy - jealousy of others, whether for their good fortune, happiness, or success - as a bad thing. We are told from childhood that we should not be envious of others, that we should instead be happy for others' good fortune and grateful for what we have. But envy has an undeservedly bad reputation. In fact, envy may help motivate people to improve themselves or accomplish their goals.

Assignment: Is envy necessarily a bad thing? Plan and write an essay in which you develop your point of view on this issue. Support your position with reasoning and examples taken from your reading, studies, experience, or observations.

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